9-12 Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

"The love of God compels us to serve others - love God and love your neighbor as yourself."

     Below is a detailed description of each of the courses offered here at San Gabriel Academy, along with the course objectives, and a summary of what is expected in the class. 

    

Course Catalog

Applied Arts

Computer Applications I:  An introductory course covering keyboarding and computer skills, including touch-typing, word processing, document formatting, spreadsheet basics, and desktop publishing basics. They will learn to use iMovie as well as a plethora of applications that will be useful in the students' academic careers.

Visual Communications: An advanced course in which the student will be introduced to basic graphic design concepts and movie making basics. They will learn the intricacies of Adobe Creative Suite applications such as Illustrator, InDesign, and Photoshop as well as iMovie. Class projects include the SGA Yearbook, SGA promotional videos and brochures, and sports slideshows/movies. Successful completion of Computer Applications 1 is required for admission to this class. 

Graphic Design: A one-semester applied arts elective designed to master the basic elements of design and receive hands-on experience. A prior familiarity with Adobe InDesign, Illustrator, and PhotoShop is recommended.

Life Skills: A one-semester applied arts elective designed to survey basic skills needed by men and women in everyday life. These skills include personal and family relationships, management of personal and family resources, nutrition and food preparation and service, and clothing selection, care, and construction. 

Yearbook: A two-semester course enabling students to learn how to design, edit, and produce the school's yearbook. Extra-curricular hours are involved during the production stage. 

English

English 9: A freshman-level course building on knowledge of English grammar to improve reading, writing, and communication skills

English 10: A sophomore-level course integrating composition and the study of literature. Students learn about literary genres and techniques to improve reading skills and discuss literary works from a variety of cultures. Composition instruction and practice focuses on descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive modes. 

English 11: A junior-level course integrating composition and the study of literature. Students read and discuss literature of the United States, from colonial times to the present. Composition instruction and practice focuses on narrative, descriptive, expository, and persuasive modes. 

English 12: A senior-level course integrating composition and the study of literature. Students read and discuss literature of Great Britain, from Anglo-Saxon times to the present. Composition instruction and practice focuses largely, but not entirely, on expository and persuasive modes, with special emphasis on preparation of the student for college writing. Each student is encouraged to individually identify and practice productive writing processes. 

Fine Arts

Chorale: A course designed for the advanced vocal student who exhibits the abilities and desire for choral performance. Students must meet all scheduled concerts. There are approximately 12-15 concerts during each school year. (Students are accepted into this course only through an audition process.)

Choir: A course open to anyone who enjoys singing. Students will learn various types of music and harmonies. Students must meet all scheduled concerts. 

Art Appreciation: A course designed to introduce students to various drawing and painting techniques and media. Students will produce a variety of projects using the techniques they have learned. 

Intermediate Art: This course will continue the student's knowledge of art and art techniques. Successful completion of Art Appreciation is required for admission to this class. 

Band/Orchestra: A course designed for the students who exhibit a technical ability and control of his/her instrument and who desire to improve his/her musical abilities and appreciation by participating in concert performances. 

Handbell Choir: A course that explores music through the medium of handbells. Beginner and advanced levels are available. 

Music Appreciation: A course designed to introduce students to the many genres of music that have been developed throughout the ages. The student will learn to appreciate various types of music. 

Foreign Language

Spanish I and II: Offered at two levels, these courses begin with an introduction to the Spanish language, with an emphasis on the understanding and speaking of Spanish and a general ability in Spanish grammar. Spanish II is designed as an intermediate, proficiency-oriented course in Spanish. In Spanish II, greater emphasis is placed on composition, reading proficiency, and conversation. These courses may be waived by students from a Spanish-speaking background upon passing proficiency tests. 

French I and II: These courses begins with an introduction to the language, emphasizing understanding, the ability to speak French, and a general ability in French grammar and pronunciation. French II is designed as an intermediate, proficiency-oriented course in French. In this course, greater emphasis is placed on composition, reading proficiency, and conversation. 

Mathematics

Pre-Algebra: Pre-Algebra is an introductory course that prepares students for Algebra 1. The course is designed to teach students fundamental algebra skills critical for success in subsequent math courses.  Some of the topics covered include simplifying expressions, real numbers, solving equations and inequalities, and graphing linear equations.

Algebra I: Algebra I is a first year course in the study of algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities, and functions.  Some of the topics covered include simplifying expressions, real numbers, solving equations/inequalities, graphing equations/inequalities, writing linear equations/inequalities, absolute value equations/inequalities, systems of equations/inequalities, direct and inverse variation, exponents and exponential functions, polynomials, factoring, quadratic equations, rational expressions/equations, radicals, and connections to geometry. PREREQUISITE: Students must pass the Algebra Readiness Test in order to enroll in this course. 

Geometry: Geometry is a course in logic, proof, and measurement.  Students will develop their ability to construct formal, logical arguments and proofs in geometric settings and problems.  Some of the topics covered include definitions, postulates, and theorems regarding angles, segments and lines, arcs, congruent triangles, similar triangles, special quadrilaterals, parallel lines, circles, coordinate geometry, area and volume formulas, transformations, constructions, and right triangle trigonometry.

Algebra II: Algebra II is a math course in the study of algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities, and functions.  This course complements and expands the mathematical content and concepts of Algebra 1 and Geometry.  Some of the topics covered include complex numbers, exponents, radicals, matrices, systems of linear equations, functions (absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, quadratic, radical, polynomial, and rational) and their behavior, solving nonlinear equations, conic sections, combinatorics, probability, and sequences/series. PREREQUISITE: Students of Algebra I and geometry who earn a C- or better and have an acceptable score on the Algebra II Placement Test are allowed to enroll in this course. 

Honors Algebra II: Honors Algebra II is a math course in the study of algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities, and functions. This course complements and expands the mathematical content and concepts of Algebra 1 and Geometry.  It is an advanced course where students learn to manipulate and apply more advanced functions and algorithms. Some of the topics covered include complex numbers, exponents, radicals, matrices, systems of linear equations, functions (absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, quadratic, radical, polynomial, and rational) and their behavior, solving nonlinear equations, conic sections, combinatorics, probability, and sequences/series. PREREQUISITES: Students must successfully complete Algebra I and geometry, with a B or better, an acceptable score on the Algebra II Readiness Test, and teacher approval in order to enroll in this course.

Pre-Calculus: Pre-calculus is a math course which emphasizes a better understanding of functions and their applications and strengthens students’ mathematical reasoning and problem-solving skills.  Some of the topics covered include trigonometry, parametric equations, polar coordinates, complex numbers, matrices, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, sequences, and series. PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Algebra I, geometry, Algebra II with a C- or better and an acceptable score on the Pre-calculus Placement Test will be required for enrollment in this course. 

Honors Pre-Calculus: Honors Pre-calculus is a math course which emphasizes a better understanding of functions and their applications and strengthens students’ mathematical reasoning and problem-solving skills. It is an advanced course which prepares students for AP Calculus. Some of the topics covered include trigonometry, parametric equations, vectors, polar coordinates, complex numbers, matrices, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, sequences, series, and limits. PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Algebra I, geometry, Algebra II or Honors Algebra II with a B or better, an acceptable score on the Pre-calculus Readiness Test, and the approval from the instructor are requirements for enrollment in this course.

AP Calculus: AP Calculus AB is a challenging in-depth study of functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, definite integrals, antiderivatives, and real-world applications of differentiation and antidifferentiation.  Students will work with functions graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally and understand the connections among these representations.  Some of the topics covered include limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives (rates of change, rectilinear motion, related rates, curve-sketching, optimization), integrals, applications of integrals (area, volumes, accumulation of change, differential equations), and techniques of integration.

AP Calculus BC includes all of the AP Calculus AB topics as well as applications using parametric, polar and vector forms, the geometric interpretation and numerical solution of differential equations, improper integrals, series, and Taylor polynomial approximations of functions. PREREQUISITES: Students must pass pre-calculus with a B or better, have an acceptable level on the Pre-calculus Readiness Test, and have approval from the instructor in order to enroll in this course. 

Physical Education

Physical Education: Various areas of physical education emphasize different athletic and physical fitness skills. The goal of this course is to develop students who will enjoy participating in sports and physical activity as a part of a healthy lifestyle. Students will be taught basic skills in a variety of sports, as well as good sportsmanship and integration of physical activity into their everyday lives. 

Health: A one-semester course designed to develop an understanding of the relationship between one's daily decisions and their effects on health. 

Varsity Sports: A course designed to teach students the skills needed to participate in competition sports such as volleyball, soccer, cross country, and basketball. Students learn sports and sportsmanship skills. Students are required to maintain academic, citizenship, and attendance grades in order to compete in the California Interscholastic Federation. (Students are accepted into this course only through an audition process.)

Religious Studies

Bible 9: A course designed to explore God's relationship to man as Creator and Redeemer through the study of the books of Genesis and the Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John). Emphasis is placed on the life and teachings of Christ. 

Bible 10: A course designed to focus on God and His relationship with people through a study of Exodus and I Corinthians. Emphasis is placed on youth problems and spiritual solutions.

Bible 11/12: Students in their junior and senior years will complete eight courses that include selections emphasizing study in a variety of New Testament books, studies on friendships and relationships, and Christian ethics and morality. 

Introduction to Christianity: A course designed to introduce students to the history of Christian ethics and morality. Students not familiar with Seventh-day Adventist practices and studies are encouraged to enroll in this course. This class may be incorporated into the ELI program. 

Science

Biology: This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of the science of life. Major biological topics are surveyed so that the knowledge gained will be especially useful for everyday living and for possible future biological studies. CO-REQUISITE: Algebra 1

AP Biology: A comprehensive and accelerated study of life at all levels of biological organization, including the areas of molecules, cells, organisms, and ecosystems. An in-depth study will be made of cellular processes, genetics, origins, survey of classification taxa and organisms' anatomy and physiology, with weekly laboratory investigations. Extra weekly lab time is required. An independent, year-long research project will be required by each student (i.e., science fair project). Advanced outside library reading is also required. Students will take the Advanced Placement Exam for biology in the spring. This course is the best choice for the student intending to pursue future biological course studies and a college preparatory science related career. PREREQUISITE: Students must have a minimum grade of "B" in Biology in order to enroll in this course.

General Chemistry: This is a survey study of most of the basic chemical concepts as required for preparation for college chemistry and prepares the student to relate to a chemical-use society.  Weekly laboratory work gives experimental experience in chemistry. Advanced outside library reading is also required. PREREQUISITE: Students must have a minimum grade of "C" in Algebra in order to enroll in this course. It is recommended that students take Algebra II concurrently with this course. 

AP Chemistry: A comprehensive college-level study of all general chemistry concepts, including methods of calculating, survey of matter, use of chemical shorthand, atomic structure and periodic properties, bonding, kinetic theory of matter and resulting states of matter, energy concepts, reaction principles, acids, bases, salts, oxidation reduction, and a survey  of organic chemistry. Emphasis is placed on experimental lab work involving mathematical and qualitative analysis. Extra weekly lab time is required. Advanced outside library reading is also required. This course is the best choice for the student intending to pursue future chemical course studies and a college preparatory science related career. This course prepares the student to take the year-end Advanced Placement Chemistry Test. PREREQUISITE: Students must have a minimum grade of "B" in Algebra II and are encouraged to have taken, or are concurrently taking Pre-Calculus in order to enroll in this course. 

Physical Science: This course provides for an introduction to many fundamental principles of the sciences of chemistry and physics. Laboratory work will be done during a lab period. This course is intended to give the non-science oriented student practical knowledge of chemistry and physics for everyday living. 

Physics: This course is designed to present the laws that govern our universe, including the study of force, motion, energy, electricity, optics, and problem solving. Labs are required. 

AP Physics: This course is a college-level course designed to deepen the understanding of the laws that govern our universe, including force, motion, energy, optics, and problem solving. This course prepares the student to take the year-end Advanced Placement Physics Test. PREREQUISITE: Students must have a minimum grade of "B" in Algebra II in order to enroll in this course.

Social Science

U.S. Government: A one-semester senior-level course designed to focus on the three-branch structure of government, the Constitution, and the privileges and responsibilities of the American citizen.

AP U.S. Government: A one-semester college-level course for high school seniors designed to take an in-depth approach to the three-branch structure of government, the Constitution, and the privileges and responsibilities of the American citizen. An emphasis is placed on critical thinking, research, and writing. This course prepares the student to take the national Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics Test. 

U.S. History: A junior-level course designed to trace the development of the United States from the early discovery of North America to the present day. Emphasis is placed on the development of democracy, geographic trends, and current events as related to the past.

AP U.S.  History: A college-level course for high school juniors designed to trace the development of the United States from the Colonial Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on the development of democracy, geographic trends, and current events as related to the past. An emphasis is placed on critical thinking, research, and writing. This course prepares the student to take the national Advanced Placement U.S. History Test. 

Economics: A one-semester study of basic economic principles, emphasizing the general development and implementation of recognized theories of macroeconomics. The course includes a limited review of selected topics of importance concerning consumer and macroeconomics, as well as an analysis of comparative economic systems. 

World History: A course designed to survey the world's history from prehistory to the present, emphasizing the diverse backgrounds of current cultures, nations, and world issues. 

Community Service (25 hours per year) 

     Each student is required to give twenty-five hours of community service for each year they attend a Seventh-day Adventist school. Community service includes volunteer work for which a student is NOT paid and does NOT receive academic credit.